TIP Blog

Why is GQ Encouraging Men to Watch More Porn?

By now it’s a well-established truth that porn is devastating young men’s sex lives. This piece from New York Magazine dating back to early 2011 lays out pretty clearly that men’s brains are not wired to be able to comprehend porn. It turns out that the ability to view a nearly infinite number of beautiful naked women on a screen at a moment’s notice has seriously distorted mens’ attraction to real-life women.

Men are beginning to lose the ability to be aroused by real women because they’ve inadvertently trained their brains to be aroused only by pornography.

And yet here we have British GQ’s Eva Wiseman recommending more porn watching for young men:

“Eva Wiseman explores why disaffected young men need more pornography: more nuance, more perspective and, crucially, more truth.”

Even though she admits this:

“At art college I picked up Andrea Dworkin’s Pornography, because I thought it might have rude bits. I was disappointed, but inadvertently learned about what Dworkin and her fellow Eighties activists threatened would happen if porn was not controlled: that men would begin to objectify women the way pornography did, encouraging incidents of rape and assault and inequality to rise. Then the internet happened and the prospect of limiting porn became an impossibility. But while unlimited free porn did change the world – and the world of desire in particular – it didn’t turn men into grabbing, rutting beasts. It did the opposite.

In 2003, Naomi Wolf visited campuses across the US to talk to students about sex. Women told her that in a “pornographised” world, rather than having all the sex, all the time, they found themselves unable to form sexual relationships with men. “For how can a real woman… possibly compete with a cybervision of perfection, downloadable and extinguishable at will?” Instead of encouraging sexual mayhem, as Dworkin predicted, Wolf concluded, The onslaught of porn is responsible for deadening male libido in relation to real women.” Last year, Ronson reported a 1,000 per cent rise in erectile dysfunction in young men since 2007, the advent of free porn. Has online porn replaced sex itself?

For a lot of men, it has.

It’s worth considering, isn’t it? And not just the effect of porn, but the digitalisation of all our sexual relationships, from gamified dating on Tinder to the advance of sex robots – a phrase I can’t type without also saying out loud in a movie trailer voice. Cultural analyst Sherry Turkle warns that we’re rapidly approaching a point where, “We may actually prefer the kinship of machines to relationships with real people.” A study by Stanford University says this might be because, as Newsweek put it, “Our brains aren’t necessarily hardwired for life in the 21st century.” Which is, well, a shame.”

Even while admitting all this, GQ still says men need to watch more porn.

Do they want to render widely men impotent?

Americans watch soooo much porn, too:

“According to the research approximately 64 percent, or two thirds, of U.S. men admit to viewing porn at least monthly, with the number of Christian men nearly equaling the national average. When divided by age “eight out of ten (79%) men between the ages of 18 and 30 view pornography at least monthly, and two thirds (67%) of men between the ages of 31 and 49 view pornography at least monthly. One half of men between 50 and 68 looks at porn monthly.” 

The study claims three out of every 10 men between the ages of 18 and 30 are daily viewers of porn; three percent of women in the same age group purportedly access pornography daily.”

It’s a major problem and nobody talks about it. Because it’s “lame” and you’re an uptight fundamentalist Christian weirdo if you do.

Pornography has totally changed in the past 20 years, too. It’s unprecedented.

Up until the advent of the internet, pornography was little more than skin mags like Playboy and Hustler, none of which featured hardcore sex scenes, and which were not nearly as widely available as online porn is today.

In order to view hardcore sex scenes, you used to have to order an actual porn tape or buy one from a sex shop. It was way more than a click away, and it definitely wasn’t free. Up until about the late 1990s, you really had to go out of your way to watch hardcore porn. Going back further in time, pornography prior to the modern era was a joke.  You can have a look at “Fanny Hill,” the first English pornographic book written and illustrated in 1748, here. It’s not even in the same ballpark as modern online porn. And it probably wasn’t easy to acquire, either.

But now watching porn is the easiest thing in the world. And ease of access–not to mention the fact that it’s free–has caused porn to proliferate wildly.

Pornhub is the 29th most visited site on the planet and the 17th most visited site in the United States:Screen Shot 2018-11-16 at 2.07.24 PM

This is a major problem.

And it’s not exactly a secret, either, especially to the author of the GQ piece. She knows full well that pornography is turning young men into a generation of impotent losers. Want to know why men are putting off marriage and why birthrates are falling all across the developed world (read: places with widespread hi-speed internet access)? Porn has a lot to do with it. Porn has radically changed modern sex.

Which then leads to the inevitable conclusion: is this what GQ magazine, and the larger Western liberal cultural/societal establishment GQ represents, wants?

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